The biggest challenge to the peace building process is the engagement with the Taliban for negotiations. The High Peace Council (HPC) that is engaged in talks with the Taliban needs to be extremely careful with the concessions given to them because the Taliban’s ideology is definitely contradictory to liberal rights. In order to reconcile with the Taliban, Afghanistan may have to agree to negotiate away hard fought gains including women’s education, representative government, and basic human rights which the Taliban may never agree upon, which is a serious issue of concern.[9]

Afghanistan shall not compromise on justice by accepting impunity of the perpetrators of conflict, nor compromise on the principles of equality of the society. The present peace building process is dominated by extremist and militants; it must include and in fact focus more on the nonviolent members of the Afghan polity that includes representatives of the Afghan civil society including moderate Muslims, scholars, technocrats, political party leaders, tribal elders, women and minority groups.[10]

Conclusion

The peace building process is not yet over and has not even matured. Afghanistan is at a crucial stage and requires the help of the international community more than ever before. The ANSF requires huge funding that the Afghan state cannot provide and hence it needs international support. The U.S must commit to provide the necessary fund required by the ANSF post 2014 for a specific time period, which is plausible as its expenses will decline with the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan. The regional strategic competition must end and the region must work together to help develop Afghanistan and create conditions for stability, as it is in the greater interest of all, including Pakistan. The political, social, and economic fabric will have to be rewoven, and the Taliban factor must be dealt with firmly with an option of protracted military involvement of the ANSF if necessary, to protect the democratic values and the freedom of the Afghan people until the Talban decides to renounce violence and accept the constitution of Afghanistan.

The conditions at the moment do not give us a promising situation of Afghanistan in future. The weak ANSF, the regional strategic competition, and the weak political and socio-economic conditions show that, if Afghanistan is to be left on its own after the withdrawal of American and the ISAF troops under the present conditions, it will go back to the civil war days.

Notes

[1] J Alexander Thier, The Future of Afghanistan, Unite States Institute of Peace, 2009

[2] C J Radin, Security and Stability in Afghanistan: Progress and risk, http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2012/05/security_and_stabili.php

[3] Ravi Sawhney, Peace and Stability in Afghanistan, http://www.indiandefencereview.com/spotlights/peace-and-stability-in-afghanistan/0/

[4] Ibid.

[5] C J Radin, Security and Stability in Afghanistan: Progress and risk, http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2012/05/security_and_stabili.php

[6] Selcuk Colakoglu, Stability of Afghanistan and regional cooperation, http://www.turkishweekly.net/columnist/3683/stability-of-afghanistan-and-regional-cooperation.html

[7] William Maley, Afghanistan and its Region, The Future of Afghanistan, Unite States Institute of Peace, 2009, pp. 86.

[8] Selcuk Colakoglu, Stability of Afghanistan and regional cooperation, http://www.turkishweekly.net/columnist/3683/stability-of-afghanistan-and-regional-cooperation.html

[9] Michael Hughes, Afghan peace process will bring anything but peace, http://www.aopnews.com/opinion/hughes_afgpeaceprocess.shtml

[10] Ibid.