The Anti-Defamation League’s Deceit Helps Sink a Judgeship

After two fair and lengthy hearings, the eight elected members of the Massachusetts Governor’s Council, in a 4-4 tie vote on March 5, refused to confirm attorney Joseph Berman to be a Superior Court judge.  It was a defeat for Governor Deval Patrick, who had nominated Mr. Berman.  But the Council took its responsibilities seriously and rendered a well-considered judgment.

Councilors voiced many concerns about the nominee.  Foremost was a lack of truthfulness.

Berman, under oath, was asked three times whether he had requested anyone to lobby the Council to advance his nomination.  Each time, he replied no.

Later, after some stumbling, he admitted to another Councilor that he had phoned State Senator – now Congresswoman – Katherine Clark to lobby Councilors.

Mr. Berman’s meager criminal trial experience also troubled Councilors. Another concern was Berman’s scant knowledge of drug abuse.  And some worried that Berman, politically active and a national leader in the heavily political Anti-Defamation League (ADL), would promote those viewpoints as a judge.

Several Councilors questioned Berman’s $100,000 in campaign contributions, including to Governor Patrick, since being turned down for a judgeship in 2004.  They saw this as a possible attempt to advance his judicial ambitions.

At his second hearing, Mr. Berman tried to deflect these criticisms.  He claimed, for example, to have misunderstood the Councilors’ questions about lobbying them. He also said he had been studying up on drug addiction and criminal law.

Berman’s being a 19-year member, and since 2006 a National Commissioner, of the ADL also caught the attention of some Councilors and media.

Recall the ADL scandal that broke out in mid-2007.  It exposed that organization’s decades-old hypocrisy in denying the Armenian genocide and colluding directly with Turkey, a major human rights violator, to defeat U.S. Congressional resolutions on that genocide.

Shocked at the ADL’s stance, the Massachusetts Municipal Association, which represents every city and town, then dropped its sponsorship of the ADL’s so-called “No Place for Hate” anti-bias program.  So did Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Lexington, Medford, Needham, Newburyport, Newton, Northampton, Peabody, Somerville, Watertown, and Westwood.  The ADL scandal quickly became national and international news.

Naturally, the Governor’s Council quizzed Berman about his ADL leadership role.  He claimed that after the scandal erupted in 2007 he and some New England ADL members tried to convince the National ADL to change its position on the Armenian genocide.   But there is no hard proof of that.  And surely Berman knew long before 2007 of the ADL’s anti-Armenian stance.  Yet he never spoke out publicly or resigned. Even after 2007, Mr. Berman remained publicly silent about the ADL’s indefensible assault on Armenian Americans.

Alongside the Council’s other concerns, Berman’s ADL record raised doubts about his worthiness to be a judge.

On August 21, 2007, the National ADL tried to squirm out of the scandal with a press release that used deceptive and legalistic wording about the Armenian genocide.  It implied that the Armenian genocide was a mere “consequence” of wartime events, which meant it wouldn’t qualify as genocide under the United Nation’s official definition.  The dishonest ADL declaration was widely rejected.

Nearly 20 countries, such as Canada, France, and Argentina, the European Union Parliament, the International Association of Genocide Scholars, and the Polish Jewish lawyer who coined the word “genocide” in the 1940s, Raphael Lemkin, have recognized the Armenian genocide of 1915 -23 committed by Turkey.

Many American human rights, ethnic, and church organizations have supported the Armenian genocide resolution.  These include the American Jewish World Service and the Jewish War Veterans of the USA.

But not the ADL nor, reports the Jewish media, the American Jewish Committee, AIPAC, and B’nai B’rith.  They adhere to a long-standing arrangement among themselves, Turkey, and Israel to deny the Armenian genocide (see “History of Lobbying” at NoPlaceForDenial.com).

The ADL professes to defend the human rights of all ethnic groups, not just Jews. It insists that the American people acknowledge and pass legislation on the Holocaust. Yet the ADL tries to prevent recognition of a Christian genocide.  The hypocrisy is astonishing.

Meanwhile, a significant precedent has been created: Members of the ADL, or similar organizations, who aspire to a higher post, particularly in government, may now be asked what they knew of their organization’s genocide hypocrisy, when they knew it, and what they did about it.  Such are the bitter fruits of deceit.

David Boyajian is a freelance journalist. Many of his articles are archived at Armeniapedia.org

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